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Use of Graph theory algorithms to determine stable paths in wireless mobile ad hoc networks 03 April 2014

Dr. Natarajan Medhanathan, Associate Professor of Computer Science at Jackson State University, Mississippi led the weekly discussion on the topic “Use of Graph theory algorithms to determine stable paths in wireless mobile ad hoc networks”. The session was broadcasted live through A-VIEW on April 3rd, 2014.

Dr. Sethuraman started his talk with the introduction to MANETs (Mobile Ad hoc Networks) and he mentioned about the use of Graph Theory Algorithms to determine stable paths in wireless mobile ad hoc networks. A MANET is a wireless network of arbitrarily moving nodes (devices) and it constrains limited transmission range among nodes, node mobility, energy and memory constraints, limited network bandwidth and interference and collision-prone communication.

The Highlights of the talk

  • Graph theoretic model for MANETs
  • Mobile Graph and Path
  • Stable Paths: Benchmarking Algorithm
  • Stable Mobile Path
  • Benchmarking Algorithm OptPath Trans
  • Largest Bottleneck Path – the bottleneck weight of a pth is the edge weight that is the smallest among the constituent edges of the path.
  • Flow-Oriented Routing Protocol (FORP) utilizes the mobility and location information of nodes (using GPS) to predict the expiration time (LET) of a wireless link.
  • Simulations – collect the mobility profile offline for each node for letting them move for the simulation period

Dr Natarajan concluded his talk by saying the reasons for adopting to graph theoretic approach – to develop a bench marking algorithm for optimal path lifetime per source-destination pair in mobile ad hoc networks using the idea of graph intersections and the framework can be used to evaluate the relative stability of MANET unicast routing protocols.

Speaker’s Profile

Dr. Natarajan Meghanathan is currently an Associate Professor of Computer Science at Jackson State University, Mississippi. He graduated with a Ph.D. in Computer Science from The University of Texas at Dallas in May 2005 and has been working at Jackson State University since Fall 2005. He has published more than 150 peer-reviewed articles in several international journals and conference proceedings. His research has been funded through the U.S. National Science Foundation (REU and TUES programs), the Army Research Lab and the Air Force Research Lab (Summer Faculty Fellowship and Minority Leaders Program). He is serving as the Editor-in-Chief of two international journals and is an active member in the editorial boards of more than 10 journals as well as in the organizing and technical committees of several international conferences. His research interests are in the areas of Wireless Ad hoc Networks, Sensor Networks, Information Assurance and Computational Biology. His contributions to education and research have been recognized in the form of various awards at university, state and professional levels.